Walk in a Victorious Mindset

IMG_6872Life can certainly be difficult, however you do not have to identify yourself as a victim of life’s circumstances, challenges, diagnosis’ or finances.
Instead choose to walk in a victorious mindset by claiming these things:

• I am favored by God

• I am a willing participant in goodness & mercy

• I am courageous

• I am a world changer

• I am a perseverant warrior

• I am the child of the “I Am!”

• I am a child of The One True King Jesus

• I am effective

• I am a faithful witness

• I am a leader

• I am a protector

• I am a seeker of wisdom

• I am expecting miracles

• I am a lifelong learner

• I am teachable

• I am reachable

• I am reliable

• I am worth more than silver & Gold

• I am brave

• I am gifted

• I am rich in love

• I am a unifier

• I am blessed beyond measure

• I am not a quitter

• I am resilient

• I am gentle

• I am not a victim

• I am healed

• I am loved

• I am an overcomer

• I am a strong contender

• I am looking forward 

• I am a giver

• I am generous

• I am kind

• I am a helper

• I am forgiven

• I am forgiving

• I am hope-filled

• I am important

• I am useful

• I am stable

• I am a nurturer

• I am saved by grace

• I am redeemed

• I am a under God’s

authority

• I am victorious

Declare these things over your life, it will both challenge and change the way you face each trial, bring hope to yourself, as well as bring hope to others watching you go through it.

Love yourself as Jesus loves you, victoriously and watch your mindset heal!

-Christina Calk-

Community of Family

Tribe by C Calk

When raising kids, it takes a tribe of love, support, and encouragement to get through the milestones of parenting. Come together with someone close to you in your community who also has children.

Celebrate the joyful moments and know they are a gift from The Lord. Also, do not neglect to pray for each other when times are difficult.

“And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.” Hebrews 10:24-25

“Let each of you look not only to his own interests but also to the interests of others.” Philippians 2:4

“But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.” Galatians 5:22

Finding Your tribe & Finding Yourself, by Christina Calk

Parents who are raising children with special needs, including those with physical, learning or emotional challenges, may find themselves feeling overwhelmed. The importance of pairing up with other families who are facing the same difficulties cannot be understated. No one understands the stressors better than someone who is going through the same or similar experiences. Schedule play dates, meet up for lunch or plan dinners together. Your children will benefit from social interaction and your family can develop a bond through sharing trials or what you have overcome through difficulties you each have faced. Another important aspect of parenting special needs children is taking time out for you. Far too often parents feel guilty for participating in hobbies or outing without their children, yet planning time for yourself is a very healthy choice and can reduce stress. Additionally caregivers need to make time for themselves in order to keep their self-identity as an individual strong. Building your identity through your hobbies, such as playing an instrument, writing, painting, running, making crafts, volunteering at a church or community organization, etc. can help you pass on a legacy of strength through trial. Not giving up on your passions can even show your children that you are an individual who is not only their parent but a healthy person.

Christina Calk is the Author of Perseverant Parenting, and Board certified Biblical Counselor.

thrive-article-2016

DFW Child Magazine, article by Christina Calk

DFW Child Magazine, Article by Christina Calk

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Parents certainly go through their share of tough times, such as illness, financial issues and other stressors. Dads and moms often lose perspective on how to encourage their children, especially when they themselves feel overwhelmed or deeply discouraged. With that said, it is completely normal for a parent to feel overwhelmed, fearful, discouraged or even inadequate during tough situations.

Acknowledging these feelings is a great place to start. As parents navigate the grueling duty of facing adversity, they should address any of their child’s concerns by openly discussing with their children what is happening. Remember, children don’t have to understand everything all at once, so use short, clear explanations when sharing details about a difficult challenge.

In essence, just give an honest, age appropriate interpretation of the situation. Sharing struggles with other parents, friends, family, clergy or counselors can provide much-needed encouragement, and parents may even consider seeking out similar sources of support for their children.

By openly expressing feelings and concerns with their children and others, parents are actually demonstrating the ability to effectively communicate, empathize and work through difficult situations.

When children realize that hardships will occur but can be worked through as a family or team, they’ll be better prepared to deal with adversity as they mature into adulthood. —Christina Calk

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